Introducing the Move programming language

Have you been through the post from Sam at the top the post

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Can some body create a series of the videos the explain how it work.
I mean something like step by step to guild newer can work with Libra blockchain (from a to z)
It can be better if we can practice on the lecture with some tools attached on the course.

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I have also searched for it on youtube but it seems that no one have taken the task of doing it yet. So, there’s an opportunity for the youtube video teachers out there.

In the meantime, I believe all we have is begin experimenting with the language ourselves. In my case, I’m still struggling to install the Libra CLI on my linux cloud server :rofl:

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It’s chance.
Please create it. My team is trying to work hard to go live online system. You can public and sell course on it

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I hope when I see of your online system! :grinning:

We hope the service can go live very soon.
After that, we will start to work with data layer and bring them to the blockchain.

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:grinning: Yes, nice idea. Maybe in a little while, once I learn it as well as to teach others. In the meantime I’ll keep learning. I believe there’s a big potential on Move.

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Hi henlatourrette,
Great to see so many learning Move.

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Another question:
Do you think we need to open the register as teacher service soon?

And a Question for @Libra_moderator1:
I my team have member want to join with your dev team work as remote developer, can we have a chance?
He can work for Libra and get know how to update for product team?

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There is a LISPy Byzantine, Multi-Paxos scheme, in the Normed space of Consensus Solutions’ engaged in, Distributed Part-Time-Parliaments; Lamport-Invariant Processes, et al.

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Hi @edulibra , I believe the best way to begin working as remote developers would be by working and contributing on the issues already raised on the Github repository here> https://github.com/libra/libra

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Just what i had in mind!.. that will be much helpful

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Hello friends,

I am a newbie here. Where do I start from if I have to write my own code in Move. I went thru the documentation but then I quickly got lost. I know very basic programming.
Any advise will be helpful.

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Thanks cedric your advice is useful

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Hi, @henlatourrette
Thank you for your suggestion,
But it can be more better if have member working closely with the facebook team. :smiley:

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How this work ? It’s Move Informatics language?!

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You can check learnlibramove.com . It is a free tutorial which will lead you learn libra through game.:smiley:

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Move is strong programming language :grinning:

Why all the blockchain platform release new language instead of using programming language available in the industry?

Good question! This is dicussed somewhat indirectly in Section 3.1 of the Libra Blockchain paper, but here is a more direct answer.

There are three: “table stakes” requirements that a programming language must satisfy to be suitable for blockchain use.

  1. Deterministic. Execution of programs in the language must be deterministic. Otherwise, validators will be unable to agree on what the next state is when a transition is nondeterministic.
  2. Hermetic. Programs in the language can only read data from the global state or the current transaction. Validators agree on these two things but not on anything else. Executing a program that (e.g.) downloads data from an arbitrary web site may return different values for different validators, which would cause validators to disagree on the next state.
  3. Metered. A single state transition should take a finite amount of time and use a finite amount of resources. Otherwise, the system will be unable to make progress beyond that transition. Existing blockchain languages typically implement metering by assigning a gas cost to each program operation, then limiting the amount of gas that each state transition is allowed to consume via runtime monitoring.

Most conventional programming languages lack all three of these qualities. For (1), lack of memory safety (e.g., C) or operations with undefined semantics (e.g., iterating over the keys of a HashMap in Java) disqualify the language. The functionality in (2) is present in most general-purpose languages because it is very important for conventional programming. Very few languages have (3) built in.

I call these “table stakes requirements” because they are only the basics of what a blockchain language needs–there are many other qualities like support for programming with assets that are crucially important, but not strictly required.

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